Medicinal & Edible Benefits of Hibiscus

The colors of Fall are beautiful with the trees changing into an array of yellow, red, gold, orange and brown. You don’t expect to see many plants producing as you do in the Summer.

hibiscus-close-up

There are some exceptions of course. The beautiful Hibiscus Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa), with its ruby red calyces and deep burgandy stems. After flowering, the calyx swell with a seed pod at which time we harvest the calyces and peel the red outer covering off to use for teas and jellies and more!

hibiscus-parts

The leaves, flowers and calyces are all edible. The calyces are well known around the world for their gorgeous red color for your teas. In Jamaica they call their drink,  Jamaican Sorrel which is made from the hibiscus calyx along with fresh ginger and sugar. It is delish!!!

I do have one hibiscus plant but it bloomed late so I only have a few calyces to pick BUT I am lucky enough to have some good friends that invited me to the farm they work at to pick all I wanted!

hibiscus-roselle
My Hibiscus plant

hibiscus-harvest

My friend Denise helped me process this giant load of hibiscus. I could not have done it without her. 🙂

hibiscus-closeup

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fresh hibiscus peeled from seed pods. Pic Credit*Denise Hardin
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the leftover pods pic credit* Denise Hardin
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All my trays of drying hibiscus!
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My favorite photographer Denise Hardin

Here is an Herb Profile for you about Hibiscus:

Herbal Lesson on Hibiscus

Hibiscus sabdariffa, also known as Roselle or Jamaican Sorrel, is a beautiful tropical plant with reddish green leaves, red stems, red calyces and pale yellow flowers with a red center. It can be grown here in Georgia if started early enough because it flowers in late summer.

Edible uses: The leaves, flowers, calyx are all edible. The red calyx swells up after flowering and then peeled to dry for teas.

To make tea: Use 1 T fresh calyces or 1-2 teaspoons dried per cup of water. Steep 10 minutes. Sweeten.

SYRUP/CORDIAL
This syrup will keep for at least a year. Once opened, it will keep for months if refrigerated. The syrup is delicious over crepes, fresh fruit, custard, ice cream. To make cordial, a very small quantity of syrup can be added to a glass and filled with water. The syrup can also be added to milk to make a delicious drink.
5 cups sugar
4 cups water
4 cups calyces, chopped
Heat the sugar and water in a large saucepan until the sugar is completely dissolved. Add the calyces and bring to the boil. Lower the heat and simmer gently until the volume of liquid is reduced by a third. Remove from the heat and strain. Bottle the syrup while still hot into clean bottles and seal. The strained calyces can be eaten as a dessert with ice cream or custard.

Medicinal Uses:  Good for the cardiovascular system – can help maintain healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Full of antioxidants, high in vitamin C

Cooling to the body and astringent due to the tartness so helpful for fevers, excess fluid, hot flashes, sore throats.

Hibiscus and Ginger Tea : 4 T fresh hibiscus and a few slices fresh ginger to a quart jar, add boiling water, let steep 10-15 minutes. Sweeten with sugar, honey – I used coconut sugar.

www.bellavistanaturals.com – Anne-Marie Bilella  – Bella Vista Farm

Have a beautiful day friends!

Expanding Gardens for More Herbs!

Spring, lovely Spring! We wait all winter long for this time of year, well at least I do. I was just itching to get out and dig, plant and harvest and just enjoy the sights and sounds of Springtime!

This year, we are growing more, hopefully 🙂 My neighbor came over with his tractor and tilled up a giant section in the herb garden for a few rows and my hubby helped me make the rows and get rid of giant clumps. Actually John did most of the making of the rows – he is better at it, a perfectionist I might add. Each row is about 35 feet long and 2 feet wide -woohoo!

garden john

garden john2

thunder
Thunder Pookie “helping”

new rows

My interns and I planted 40 calendula plants, 4 ashwagandha, 4 hibiscus roselle – all in the rows and huckleberries, stevia, quinoa, spilanthes(toothache plant) and echinacea in various raised beds and wild areas. I cannot wait til they grow!!!

garden

burdock
Burdock
lilly bed
Lillies and stuff
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first blooms in the butterfly garden – purple homestead verbena taking over!!!
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Faithful comfrey always keeping on giving 🙂

Seeds were started for arugula, skullcap, sage, borage, lettuce, marshmallow, nastursiums and more. I am not good at seed starting so I figured between me, Stephanie and Brooke, two of my three interns, we should have a good shot at it. They can help me remember to check on them and thin when necessary. Keep your fingers crossed!

Many of the plants I get are started by local friends – ❤ Friends that grow things very well from seeds! New plants go into the raised boxes until I know they can succeed with my sometimes neglect. Any that have to be pampered don’t get to stay. I know that’s mean but besides tending to the plants, I have to take care of critters, teach classes, prepare for classes, making product, delivering products, doing event, yada yada yada and of course take care of the family! I love plants that are naturally strong and perennials to boot.

I also started new mushrooms – trying Oyster mushrooms this time around. We shall see if they grow. I did them on straw in bags and in buckets. A teeny, tiny one is growing out of the straw – hope it will become a big bunch!!!!

oyster

Sorry a bit blurry!

More thing growing coming soon!

Have a beautiful, peaceful day today,

Anne-Marie

 

 

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